Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Google translate



View translations easily as you browse the web. By the Google Translate team.
Highlight or right-click on a section of text and click on Translate icon next to it to translate it to your language. Or, to translate the entire page you're visiting, click the translate icon on the browser toolbar.

Learn more about Google Translate at https://support.google.com/translate.

By installing this extension, you agree to the Google Terms of Service and Privacy Policy at https://www.google.com/intl/en/policies.

UPDATE (v.2.0): Now you can highlight or right-click a text and translate it vs. translate the entire page. You can also change extension options to automatically show translation every time you highlight text.

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

How to browse the Internet safely at work





This Safer Internet Day, we teamed up with ethical hacking and web application security company Detectify to provide security tips for both workplace Internet users and web developers. This article is aimed at employees of all levels. If you’re a programmer looking to create secure websites, visit Detectify’s blog to read their guide to HTTP security headers for web developers.

More and more businesses are becoming security- and privacy-conscious—as they should be. When in years past, IT departments’ pleas for a bigger cybersecurity budget fell on deaf ears, this year, things have started looking up. Indeed, there is nothing quite like a lengthening string of security breaches to grab people’s—and executives’—attention.

Purely reacting to events is a bad terrible approach, and organizations who handle and store sensitive client information have learned this the hard way. It not only puts businesses in constant firefighting mode, but is also a sign that their current cybersecurity posture may be inadequate and in need of proper assessment and improvement.

Part of improving an organization’s cybersecurity posture has to do with increasing its employees’ awareness. Being their first line of defense, it’s only logical to educate users about cybersecurity best practices, as well as the latest threats and trends. In addition, by providing users with a set of standards to adhere to, and maintaining those standards, organizations can create an intentional culture of security.

Developing these training regimens requires a lot of time, effort, and perhaps a metaphorical arm and a leg. Do not be discouraged. Companies can start improving their security posture now by sharing with employees a helpful and handy guide on how to safely browse the Internet at work, whether on a desktop, laptop, or mobile phone.


Safe Internet browsing at work: a guideline

Take note that some of what’s listed below may already be in your company’s Employee Internet Security Policy, but in case you don’t have such a policy in place (yet), the list below is a good starting point.


Make sure that your browser(s) installed on your work machine are up-to-date.


The IT department may be responsible for updating employee operating systems (OSes) on remote and in-house devices, as well as other business-critical software. It may not be their job, however, to update software you’ve installed yourself, such as your preferred browser. The number one rule when browsing the Internet is to make sure that your browser is up-to-date. Threats such as malicious websites, malvertising, and exploit kits can find their way through vulnerabilities that out-of-date browsers leave behind.

While you’re at it, updating other software on your work devices keeps browser-based threats from finding other ways onto your system. If IT doesn’t already cover this, update your file-compressor, anti-malware program, productivity apps, and even media players. It’s a tedious and often time-consuming task, but—shall we say—updating is part of owning software. You can use a software updater program to make the ordeal more manageable. Just don’t forget to update your updater, too.


If you have software programs you no longer use or need, uninstall them.


Let’s be practical: There’s really no reason to keep software if you’ve stopped using it or if it’s just part of bloatware that came with your computer. It’s also likely that, since you’re not using that software, it’s incredibly outdated, making it an easy avenue for the bad guys to exploit. So do yourself a favor and get rid. That’s one less program to update.


Know thy browser and make the most of its features.


Modern-day browsers like Brave, Vivaldi, and Microsoft Edge have launched quite a bit differently than their predecessors. Other than their appealing customization schemes, they also boast of being secure (or private) by default. By contrast, browsers that have been around for a long time continue to improve on these aspects, as well as their versatility and performance.

Regardless of which browser you use, make it a point to review its settings (if you haven’t already) and configure them with security and privacy in mind. The US-CERT has more detailed information on how to secure browsers, which you can read through here.


Use a password manager. 


It may sound like this advice is out of place, but we include it for a reason. Password managers don’t just store a multitude of passwords and keep them safe. They can also stop your browser from pre-filling fields on seemingly legitimate, but ultimately malicious sites, making it an unlikely protector against phishing attempts. So the next time you receive an email from your “bank” telling you there’s a breach and you have to update your password, and your password manager refuses to pre-fill that information, scrutinize the URL in the address bar carefully. You might be on a site you don’t want to be on.



All credit for this article goes to:https://blog.malwarebytes.com/101/2019/02/how-to-browse-the-internet-safely-at-work/